Stories

2017 – University of Minnesota

Christmas trees, menorahs, and the colors red, green, silver, and blue have been deemed inappropriate for college campuses this holiday season, at least according to an official at the University of Minnesota. Only general decorations and party themes such as “winter celebration” were allowed at the University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) “Respecting Religious Diversity” event this month.

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2016 – American Humanist Association

In an almost unbelievable act of Christmas time stinginess, this holiday season the American Humanist Association went to court in Colorado in an effort to stop public school children from volunteering for a program that sends care packages to children in need.

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2015 — The Department of Veterans Affairs

The Department of Veteran Affairs bans employees at its Salem, Virginia facility from saying “Merry Christmas” to veterans.

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2014 — The City of Sioux Falls

The City of Sioux Falls threatened to repaint and censor snowplows with artwork celebrating the religious nature of Christmas.

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2013 — Wisconsin Department of Administration

Wisconsin’s Department of Administration apparently doesn’t know that it is constitutionally permissible for the government to have a tasteful Christmas display.

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2012 — Gov. Lincoln Chaffee’s ‘Holiday Tree’ in Rhode Island

Governor Chaffee was embarrassed when a flash mob showed up to the lighting of his Holiday Tree and defiantly sang “O Christmas Tree.”  To avoid a repeat this year, he announced the lighting ceremony only 30 minutes before it happened.

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2011 — The U.S. Post Office

Despite Benjamin Franklin’s command, as founder of the Post Office, to “always live jollily; for a good conscience is a continual Christmas,” the carolers have fallen victim to the ridiculous policy that you are not allowed to sing Christmas carols on government property.

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2010 — Philadelphia Mayor, Richard Negrin

This year’s Ebenezer went to Philadelphia Deputy Mayor, Richard Negrin, for forcing the “Christmas Village” to take “Christmas” off its traditional entry archway and replace it with the word “Holiday”.

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2009 — Kokomo, Indiana County Courthouse

This court house had a holiday display consisting of a Loch Ness Monster, a woodpecker and a fire truck, and showed no symbol of any known holiday being celebrated anywhere in the world this December.

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2008 — Florida Gulf Coast University President Wilson Bradshaw

Wilson Bradshaw won this year for first canceling all holiday festivities and decoration at FGCU. He later reversed his decision after getting much unwanted national attention and criticism.

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2007 — Rev. Barry Lynn

This year, the Ebenezer went to Rev. Barry Lynn, executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, for protesting a church-sponsored shoe giveaway.

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2006 — Chicago Mayor Richard Daley

Mayor Daley removed the film The Nativity Story from the Christmas festival. He later announced that he was reversing a previous decision announced by his office, and scenes from the film would be allowed to play at the festival

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2005 — Mitchell Pashkin

Mr. Pashkin filed a federal lawsuit against the Town of Huntington’s neutral, harmless holiday display, which consists of a Christmas tree, menorah, crèche, and Peace on Earth sign.

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2004 — Lake Washington High School in Kirkland, Washington

This school “banned” a stage production of A Christmas Carol because the school feared it would violate the constitutional separation of church and state.

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2003 — New York City Public Schools

The school system’s policy allows the display of Jewish menorahs and the Muslim star and crescent, but not a Christian nativity scene.

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2002 — Virginia Beach, Virginia bureaucrats

They tried to shut down “Mothers, Inc.,” a Christian-based charity run by Brenda McCormick that distributes Christmas and Thanksgiving turkeys and other food, as well as household items, clothing and toys to the poor and needy.

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2001 — Kensington, Maryland’s Santa ban

In 2001, a council decided to replace the “peace tree,” or the Christmas tree, with a “peace banner” and to remove Santa from their tree lighting ceremony.

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2000 — City Manager Jim Johnson

This city manager of Eugene, Oregon, issued a five-page, single-spaced memo banning Christmas trees from any “public space” in the city.

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